Californian White Sage

Smudging is a traditional Native
American method of burning sacred herbs to produce aromatic smoke
which is used in cleansing or prayer ceremonies and purification or healing
rituals. It is the ritual cleansing of the mind, body and spirit. It is also
used to cleanse and purify rooms and spaces.

Smudge is the name given to the dried herbs used in a smudging
ceremony. These can be loose leaves or a bundle (also known as a smudge stick).

Before
you light your sage, and begin the process of smudging a room or your entire
home, it’s best to start with a prayer and set your intention to cleanse
the space and release any and all negative energies.

Carefully
light your white sage at the tips of the leaves, making sure you have a
fireproof bowl or plate ready to catch any ash as it burns.

Sage
smudging is most powerful when simply smouldering and smoking. If your sage is
burning and you can see the flame, just blow it out and you’re ready to begin
smudging.

When
smudging your house, you’ll want to start from the back of the house and
move to the front. If you have multiple levels, start from the bottom of
the house and move to the top.

When you select the room you’re going to start
smudging in, begin in one corner of the room and move methodically around
the room.

As
you smudge, make sure to waft the smoke up toward the ceiling and down to the
floor, starting
from the bottom and moving to the top. Try to
get behind furniture and in all other nooks and crannies in the space.

You can
use your hand, a feather, or a small paper fan to waft the smoke, or simply
push the smoke where you want it to go by carefully moving the entire smudge
stick (and your fireproof bowl to catch ashes) in that direction.

When you
reach a window or door, waft the smoke into all four corners, beginning at the
bottom left and moving in a clockwise direction. Remember to waft the smoke
into cupboards too.

The last
room you smudge should be the one with the front door.

When
you’re finished, move outside and waft around the four corners of the door.

And
finally, close with a prayer of thanks.